We had the pleasure to have a talk with Patrizia Finucci Gallo, fashion influencer and founder of PFG Style. Read our interview!


Patrizia Finucci Gallo is a famous italian journalist, writer and teacher.

She’s the founder of PFG Style: since 2011, PFG Style is the first blog in Italy to combine fashion and literature, fashion and the art of dining, and, generally speaking, fashion and culture.

PFG Style is nowadays an authority when it comes to fashion advice and cultural influence.

Patrizia Finucci Gallo is also famous for creating a cultural salon (Salotto) in her own house, where she hosts renowned personalities from the fashion and cultural field.

Read the full interview to find out more!

Questions FOR PATRIZIA FINUCCI GALLO

  1. Hi Patrizia, thank you for your availability. Could you kindly introduce yourself and tell us what you do?
  2. How did the idea for Pfgstyle come about?
  3. What is the purpose of your cultural salon?
  4. Do you have any funny anecdote to tell us about the meetings in your salon?
  5. Which fashion personalities did you host?
  6. In what way do you think fashion is culture?
  7. What kind of connection exists between fashion and writing? And between fashion and the art of dining?
  8. From your perspective as an established writer and journalist, how has writing changed with the rise of digital?
  9. In 2015 you published a book called “Being a Dandy in Ten Moves”. How would you define the style of a dandy nowadays?
  10. In your opinion, what role does footwear play in a person’s style?
  11. How would you define Borgioli’s style?

#1. Hi Patrizia, thank you for your availability. Could you kindly introduce yourself and tell us what you do?

I started my career as a journalist, now I write books and deal with fashion and culture.

a talk with patrizia finucci gallo

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#2. How did the idea for Pfgstyle come about?

I wanted to tell about the world of fashion from a different point of view, not that of an insider.

At the beginning, I thought I would write a book whose protagonist would be a fashion blogger, so pfgstyle was born to collect material and work on it later. Then I never finished the book, in the meantime I published another one and pfgstyle turned into a lifestyle website dedicated to my salon.

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#3. What is the purpose of your cultural salon?

The salon is a form of communication. Conversation and stories make everything more real, more empathetic. Characters tell their stories, express the best of themselves and, in this way, guests are given evenings that have the taste of truth.

il salotto di patrizia finucci gallo

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#4. Do you have any funny anecdote to tell us about the meetings in your salon?

One in particular has amused me a lot. Every time I open my house for the salon, I host about fifty people, always different. I use antique ceramic plates and glassware. At 7 p.m. I start with the Golden Table, placé, ten people including the host, and at 8:30 p.m. I prepare the standing Flower Table for the rest of the guests.

My house is full of books and every time, at the end of the evening, I always found the remaining wine glasses laying or balanced on the volumes or on the floor on the carpets. Then once a guest prepared and distributed an amusing behavioral decalogue about the art of laying down glasses: I believe he made a pamphlet out of it.

Since the pandemic broke out, except for the red zone, the salon has been held in the large hall or in the open-air space of the Hotel Il Guercino.

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#5. Which fashion personalities did you host?

A lot, but all people I follow and like: Antonio Mancinelli, editor-in-chief of Marie Claire, a pen with a narrative attitude and an eye focused on the cultural aspects of dressing; or Marina Di Guardo, the salon introduced us and made us friends, a beautiful person who is sweet and fashionable but with a spectacular creative noir.

patrizia finucci gallo and marina di guardo

But also the designer Mario Costantino Triolo, who dressed me for the red carpet at the Venice Film Festival: I love his closeness to the futurist period, after Liberty which is my favorite. And then Alessandro Marocchi, founder of Slow Dandy, a very smart format created to promote the style and thought of those who recognize themselves in being dandy.

patrizia finucci gallo and antonio mancinelli

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#6. In what way do you think fashion is culture?

It is because it tells about the historical moment in which it takes place. In the past, there have been interesting mixtures and collaborations between fashion and literature: for instance, the writer and artist Jean Cocteau designed clothes for the fashion designer Elsa Schiaparelli. In these last years, the dialogue has been a little interrupted. It is more alive in the world of art.

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#7. What kind of connection exists between fashion and writing? And between fashion and the art of dining?

Literature has a lot in common with fashion, to the point that it often determines its style. We saw this with Colette, her novel Claudine and then the series, launched “Claudine fashion” among teenagers in the early twentieth century; the thought of Jean-Paul Sartre generated the trend of existentialism, and on the wave of Being and Nothingness an entire generation of young intellectuals identified with it, including the wonderful Juliette Gréco.

And so the art of dining: from the triumph of beauty in past eras to finger food to make banqueting quick and easy, dining follows fashion. Nowadays it expresses time and poetry. A return to conversation and intimacy. And to a scenographic expression of food and mise en place.

interview with patrizia finucci gallo

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#8. From your perspective as an established writer and journalist, how has writing changed with the rise of digital?

You mean with social? Writing is completely different. Even in journalism. Writing an article, or a text, meant for online users requires speed of reading and a careful eye toward SEO to reach more audience.

A product that will be published on paper, article or book, has a different perception and a different way of reading. So, the author will be less “locked up” in seo power dynamics and will be able to attract his readers’ attention thanks to traditional beautiful writing. In both cases, “content is the king.”

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#9. In 2015 you published a book called “Being a Dandy in Ten Moves”. How would you define the style of a dandy nowadays?

More than a style, it is a way of life, then as now. The fashion side of a true dandy is exactly the aesthetic reconstruction of the soul. A way of thinking. My image of the perfect dandy in Italy is Fornasetti. It is absolutely forbidden for women to imitate men, only George Sand could afford it because she was fighting her social battle.

The dandy woman has her own style, you can recognize her immediately. She doesn’t imitate, she chooses and lives her character. An example? The American egyptologist Colleen Darnell, you can find her on instagram as vintage egyptologist.

being a dandy in ten moves patrizia finucci gallo

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#10. In your opinion, what role does footwear play in a person’s style?

A very important role, it is the accessory that makes or breaks you. An ugly pair of shoes, or an inappropriate pair of shoes, is worse than a bad makeup.

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#11. How would you define Borgioli’s style?

I would put it among the top ten items that are essential to be a dandy. It’s not by chance that I’m here.

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We would like to thank Patrizia Finucci Gallo for the interesting interview and for her availability. Here are some useful links to follow her: